Violette (2013)

Apparently my own personal theme of this year’s MSP film festival is “complicated and sometimes painful relationships in post-war France.” I just got back from seeing Violette, a biopic of Violette Leduc, heavily focusing on her complex relationship with Simone de Beauvoir. It was kind of emotional devastating - it might take me a bit of time to recover - but it certainly is good inspiration to want to dive back into some of my writing. If you’re a fan of either woman, I would highly recommend it! 

Violette (2013)

Apparently my own personal theme of this year’s MSP film festival is “complicated and sometimes painful relationships in post-war France.” I just got back from seeing Violette, a biopic of Violette Leduc, heavily focusing on her complex relationship with Simone de Beauvoir. It was kind of emotional devastating - it might take me a bit of time to recover - but it certainly is good inspiration to want to dive back into some of my writing. If you’re a fan of either woman, I would highly recommend it! 

lbmisscharlie

Smith College, 1939. Here, Smith students prove they never sacrificed style for school, wearing their beloved fur coats with protective sunglasses.
Perhaps more than most, Seven Sisters women were particularly conscious of the responsibility to strike a balance between challenging traditional clothing conventions and maintaining their femininity. After all, they carried with them the pressures and outspoken public judgments regarding their status as America’s first Ivy League women.
-Seven Sisters Style, Rebecca C. Tuite

Smith College, 1939. Here, Smith students prove they never sacrificed style for school, wearing their beloved fur coats with protective sunglasses.

Perhaps more than most, Seven Sisters women were particularly conscious of the responsibility to strike a balance between challenging traditional clothing conventions and maintaining their femininity. After all, they carried with them the pressures and outspoken public judgments regarding their status as America’s first Ivy League women.

-Seven Sisters Style, Rebecca C. Tuite

lbmisscharlie

A Wellesley girl steps up to the plate in her bloomers during a baseball game in 1919.

Bloomers certainly served their intended purpose well during game time, but they were not entirely devoid of aesthetic appeal and students went one step further and attempted to integrate them into their everyday attire. Students infuriated professors by wearing their “knickerbocker suits” to class, leading to an outright ban, but not before a significant number of girls had adopted the “very natty appearance.”

-Seven Sisters Style, Rebecca C. Tuite
A Wellesley girl steps up to the plate in her bloomers during a baseball game in 1919.
Bloomers certainly served their intended purpose well during game time, but they were not entirely devoid of aesthetic appeal and students went one step further and attempted to integrate them into their everyday attire. Students infuriated professors by wearing their “knickerbocker suits” to class, leading to an outright ban, but not before a significant number of girls had adopted the “very natty appearance.”
-Seven Sisters Style, Rebecca C. Tuite
lbmisscharlie

In 1944, when Life magazine published a photograph of two Wellesley girls wearing sagging jeans and baggy shirts, an image that “made the nation’s jaw drop and set tongues wagging round the country,” the presence of denim in the wardrobes of female collegians was thrust into the national spotlight. Wellesley students were not about to take this attack lying down, however, and wrote their own letter to Life, retorting, “We do not sympathize with stringy hair and baggy shirts, but we will fight to the death for our right to wear dungarees on the proper occasions”….However, such forthright proclamations were precisely what the traditionalists feared: would denim jeans and all-female campus environments charge America’s young college women into dangerous and radical revolutionaries?
-Seven Sisters Style, Rebecca C. Tuite

In 1944, when Life magazine published a photograph of two Wellesley girls wearing sagging jeans and baggy shirts, an image that “made the nation’s jaw drop and set tongues wagging round the country,” the presence of denim in the wardrobes of female collegians was thrust into the national spotlight. Wellesley students were not about to take this attack lying down, however, and wrote their own letter to Life, retorting, “We do not sympathize with stringy hair and baggy shirts, but we will fight to the death for our right to wear dungarees on the proper occasions”….However, such forthright proclamations were precisely what the traditionalists feared: would denim jeans and all-female campus environments charge America’s young college women into dangerous and radical revolutionaries?

-Seven Sisters Style, Rebecca C. Tuite

peninsulamamoenam

A Change to the Daphne Award Shortlist

spoliamag:

caravaggio.jpg

Image by Caravaggio, murdering fuckhead

We made a change to the Daphne shortlist. We removed David Irving’s Destruction in Dresden in favor of Jessica Mitford’s The American Way of Death.

I have a… standard, let’s call it. I believe that it’s important to separate the art from the artist, but only when they are dead. When artists are raping or beating their wives and still up and around, I am of the opinion that you should not give them your money or support. Part of it is because of this here. Do I want that artist that I happen to like who murdered his wife and got away with it to have more money to do things with and enjoy his life? Do I want to express my value to him in the form of cash? No, not really. And it’s not like someone like Woody Allen needs my money at this point, but it’s the principle of the thing. My money is finite, I’ll give it to someone who isn’t an asshole.

Because of all that, letting Destruction in Dresden onto the shortlist, given that its author is a Holocaust denying fuckhead (alleged! He sues!) and is still alive, was a difficult decision to make. And I never quite felt okay with it, as much as I admire the book. After a couple conversations, and then bringing it to a vote with the nonfiction panelists, we decided to remove the book after all. And replace it with a Mitford, whose family knows all about being fuckheads, but okay. (That’s a really nice top you’ve got on, Unity, where’d you get it? It’s so cute, oh my god, really? Really, Unity Mitford?) Jessica was a tough babe, she’ll be fine.

I still think there’s an interesting conversation to be had around Destruction in Dresden, but maybe we’ll do it without the book in play. Stan Carey, one of our panelists, recommended Gregory Bateson’s Steps to an Ecology of Mind, which also discusses how we turn other people into something less than human, and don’t regret wiping them out.

As a result of all this, the Daphne Awards, which would have been announced May-ish, will probably have to be pushed back a little, we had a new book to order and distribute. (And read. And debate.) We’ll keep you posted.