peninsulamamoenam replied to your post “I got almost none of my necessary reading for the week done this…”

TELL ME MORE ABOUT THIS RASPBERRY ICE CREAM

Hold on everyone, I’m going to ice-cream-maker evangelize for a bit! So, if, once you have your kitchen basics, you’re looking for something a little more fun, maybe a bit of a splurge, might I recommend an ice cream maker? It’s easily the best kitchen space-taker-upper I’ve ever had (deep fryers are fun, but clean-up is a nightmare; I don’t bake so would never use a kitchenaid mixer; and I’m a single person rarely in need of the chopping/grating capabilities of a big food processor; your needs, of course, may vary). I have this big 2 quart beauty, but there are lots of 1.5 quart ones that are less expensive (don’t get a hand-crank one unless you have lots of people to bribe into cranking it; on the other hand, do get the kick-around ball version if you have a small child who needs to be exhausted before being given more sugar and report back to me how well it works!)

There are many, many fancy custard-based ice creams you can make which take some advanced planning and time; I’ve made a spiced chocolate similar to this before and it was amazing, and I did this pumpkin ice cream just last week for a friend’s birthday. But my favorites are the berry-based ones, because if you’ve got your freezer bowl already cold (you should probably just leave it in the freezer, for all spur-of-the-moment ice cream needs), it can be done in an afternoon. My fool-proof recipe:

Let 1 1/2 cups berries (frozen or fresh) macerate with 1 tbsp sugar for minimum half-hour, up to overnight (until thawed and sitting in their own juices). Once berries are ready, whisk 2 cups heavy cream, 1 cup whole milk, 1 cup sugar, and 1 tsp vanilla extract until sugar is dissolved. Stir in berries and juice, pour into your rotating ice cream maker, and mix for 20-30 minutes. Scoop into a Tupperware and freeze for 2 hours. Lick all the leftovers off the paddle and your spoon, making sure to get the fully-frozen bits around the edges of the freezer bowl that were “too hard” to scoop out with the rest. So easy! (Note: this amount is for a 2-quart machine; adjust accordingly for a smaller machine or risk ice cream pouring out of the top when it expands. Believe me, I know from whence I speak!)

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Things I learnt today: During WW1, MI5 used Girl Guides to send secret messages. They used Girl Guides because they quickly found that Boy Scouts couldn’t be trusted and were’t efficient enough.

At the start of the war Boy Scouts were also used. But it quickly became clear that Girl Guides were more efficient because they were less boisterous and talkative.

the boy scouts were too gossipy, so they used girl guides as spies instead this is probably the best day of my life

I got almost none of my necessary reading for the week done this weekend, but I’m still counting it as a successful few days, as I got so much done in the self-care/home-care areas that I feel much more on top of my life than I have in weeks.

  • Bought and installed new shelves to store & arrange shoes and jewelry
  • Cleaned up and arranged my desk so it is (mostly) usable
  • Weekly vacuum/dust to combat Imogen’s hair
  • Drinks & chats with IRL friends x2 plus long chat with peninsulamamoenam
  • Second and third (hopefully final) edits to the conference paper I’m presenting this week, and all materials sent off to the panel chair
  • Appointment made for Imogen to have 2 teeth extracted (poor beastie)
  • Lesson plans on censorship made
  • Peaky Blinders caught up with
  • Lots of late-breaking heat wave sunny walks with the timorous beastie, plus lots of cuddles and belly rubs to combat how stressed her newly-developed stranger danger aggression issues are making me
  • Two proper breakfasts and two proper dinners cooked and eaten, plus some kick-ass raspberry ice cream made
  • And now to bed!

Creating GI Jane: Sexuality and Power in the Women’s Army Corps During World War II, Leisa D. Meyer (1996)

Further to this post, anyone interested in queer histories of WWII might want to check out this book! We read a couple of chapters for class, and I’ve duly added it to my winter break/summer break possible future fic research list.

In Creating GI Jane, Leisa Meyer traces the roots of a cultural anxiety at the core of the American psyche, providing the historical perspective needed to understand the controversies still surrounding the gendered military. Drawing upon a rich array of sources including oral histories, army papers, congressional hearings, cartoons, and editorials, Meyer paints nuanced portraits of the experiences of women soldiers against the backdrop of strife and opportunity during the war years.
The book chronicles the efforts of the female WAC administration to counter public controversy by controlling the type of women recruited and regulating service-women’s behavior. Reflecting and reinforcing contemporary sexual stereotypes, the WAC administration recruited the most “respectable” white middle-class women, limited the number of women of color, and screened against lesbian enlistments. As Meyer demonstrates, the military establishment also upheld current sex and race occupational segregation, assuring the public that women were in the military to do “women’s work” within it, and resisting African-American women’s protests against their relegation to menial labor.
Yet Creating GI Jane is also the story of how, in spite of a palpable climate of repression, many women effectively carved out spaces and seized opportunities in the early WAC. African-American women and men worked together in demanding civil rights deriving from military service. Lesbians found the military simultaneously dangerous and conducive to community formation during and after the war. In this fresh, provocative analysis, Meyer offers compelling evidence that these struggles had lasting effects on larger civil rights movements that emerged in the postwar years.

Creating GI Jane: Sexuality and Power in the Women’s Army Corps During World War II, Leisa D. Meyer (1996)

Further to this post, anyone interested in queer histories of WWII might want to check out this book! We read a couple of chapters for class, and I’ve duly added it to my winter break/summer break possible future fic research list.

In Creating GI Jane, Leisa Meyer traces the roots of a cultural anxiety at the core of the American psyche, providing the historical perspective needed to understand the controversies still surrounding the gendered military. Drawing upon a rich array of sources including oral histories, army papers, congressional hearings, cartoons, and editorials, Meyer paints nuanced portraits of the experiences of women soldiers against the backdrop of strife and opportunity during the war years.

The book chronicles the efforts of the female WAC administration to counter public controversy by controlling the type of women recruited and regulating service-women’s behavior. Reflecting and reinforcing contemporary sexual stereotypes, the WAC administration recruited the most “respectable” white middle-class women, limited the number of women of color, and screened against lesbian enlistments. As Meyer demonstrates, the military establishment also upheld current sex and race occupational segregation, assuring the public that women were in the military to do “women’s work” within it, and resisting African-American women’s protests against their relegation to menial labor.

Yet Creating GI Jane is also the story of how, in spite of a palpable climate of repression, many women effectively carved out spaces and seized opportunities in the early WAC. African-American women and men worked together in demanding civil rights deriving from military service. Lesbians found the military simultaneously dangerous and conducive to community formation during and after the war. In this fresh, provocative analysis, Meyer offers compelling evidence that these struggles had lasting effects on larger civil rights movements that emerged in the postwar years.